Coffee seems like a simple thing

Made to your order

Made to your order

Many of us make it every morning

Or stop by our favorite cafe

Still sleepy until the first sip

We believe

Simple Things Done Well Make Life Richerâ„¢

Sorting coffee fruits after picking

Sorting coffee fruits after picking

But coffee is not a simple thing

From seedlings, above, to harvest, left

Takes three to four years

Of nuture

Harvesting is Hard Work

In Papua New Guinea it may take four days to truck the crop down from the mountains to harbor. If the roads are intact.

In Papua New Guinea it may take four days to truck the crop down from the mountains to harbor. If the roads are intact.

The best farm workers may pick

JUST 200 POUNDS OF COFFEE CHERRIES A DAY

On a steep hill, under hot sun

Or a steady rain

Specialty grade coffees we buy are selectively harvested

Only ripe coffee cherries are picked by hand

FARM TO PROCESSING

Dennis, our host at Planta Procesadora Diria, raked through an end-of-season batch of organic coffee on a drying patio.

Dennis, our host at Planta Procesadora Diria, raked through an end-of-season batch of organic coffee on a drying patio.

Two primary ways to process coffee are natural, or dry, processing and wet processing. Processing further sorts the cherries then removes four layers -- pulp, mucilage, parchment and silverskin -- leaving the beans.

When the pulp and all or some of the mucilage are removed, beans are laid in elevated drying tables or on patios to dry to ~11% moisture content to prepare for storage and shipping. Parchment and silverskin are milled off just prior to sorting, quality grading and shipping.

The farm worker's 200 pounds of cherries are now down to ~64 pounds of processed beans

The methods and care in processing can affect flavor profiles. The Costa Rican farm, Las Lajas, its processing plant shown above, markets several variations based on drying method alone.

OUR MISSION IS TO RESPECT THE PEOPLE WHO PRODUCE YOUR COFFEE FROM FARM TO YOUR CUP.

Final sorting by hand.

Final sorting by hand.

On the slopes of Uganda's Rwenzori Mountains, 1,200 members of the Bakonzu tribe have formed Bukonzo Organics (BOCU). They are among the first farmers in Uganda to produce Fair-Trade and Organic Certified coffees.

We feature a coffee from one of BOCU's 12 mills as UGANDA NAYABIRONGO and the price we paid stemmed from a premium at the farm gate over the common Fair Trade benchmark.

Like others in specialty coffee, we've found that focusing on quality provides better assurance of social, economic and environmental equity at the farm level

Shipped across continents and oceans, coffee arrives at our roasting plant.

AT CONSCIOUS CUP, WE ROAST IN SMALL BATCHES

This gets us the airflow and long temperature curve that delivers a fully developed, light- to medium-roast coffee

We seek to highlight the unique flavorsinherent to the nature of each coffee we import and roast

Go darker or too hot too fast and the roast is imposed on the coffee; the flavor turns toward the late blackening stages of caramelization and can taste burnt or bitter

WE DON'T TAKE FOR GRANTED

what we deliver to your cup.

whether Brewed coffee

a hand-prepped Pour Over

a contemporary Vanilla E Caramello

or a very traditional Cappuccino.

Our baristas practice. The latte art isn't just for show but to demonstrate that the espresso is well-prepared with a lasting, heady creama, and that the milk is frothed to silky smooth perfection

We want each drink you order to be expressly yours

Please ask if you don't see your preference

FLAVOR IS DETERMINED BY

TERROIR, OR THE GROUND THE COFFEE IS GROWN IN

Intensity of the sun it is grown beneath

Amount of nurturing rainfall

The varietal of Arabica coffee

Altitude at which it is grown

How selectively it is picked, processed and dried

How the coffee is roasted

Method by which your cup is prepared

The fun is exploring the world of coffee